Transition metal

Photo: Julie Travis

A few updates to note: regarding the second short story collection – March Of The Marvellous is now in its second draft. It’s one of those stories that virtually wrote itself – it was just a matter of writing it down as quickly as possible. It’s somewhat different in tone to the rest of the stories in the collection, being more of a dark fantasy with social/political undertones. And a nasty ending. Saying that, the last story for the collection, Beautiful Silver Spacesuits, has a political backdrop but in contrast is proving incredibly difficult to write. Some stories are just like that, for me at any rate. But progress is still being made, and everything else is almost ready to send to the publisher.

The Killing It Softly 2 anthology is progressing well. It’s going to be a huge book – forty stories long – with a couple of big names signed up. Being so removed from what is, I suppose, my ‘peer group’, the other authors are unfamiliar to me, so this will be a good chance to see what other female horror (ish!) writers are coming up with. Due to the size of the book, the stories have been split into four sections, with mine coming in the third: Another Space, Another Time/Monster Party/Cognitive Deception/The Changed And The Undead. This gives some real cohesion to the book, I think, and my story, Blue, fits extremely well under its heading. Promotional work is beginning to be put together for this publication, and I have already submitted a short bio and an ethereal photo of myself. I’m using the term ‘Transgenre’ to describe my writing, a hark back to an event with performance poet Joelle Taylor many years ago in London. The term is a respectful nod to the huge discussions taking place at the time about Transgender issues.

In a surprising turn of events, I have heard from Diva magazine – they still want to do a feature on the Rebel Dykes film, and they still want me to write it. The release date for the film is some time next year, so when this will happen and what form it will take, I don’t know. There has been a lot going on behind the scenes with this – as I indicated in my last post – so I expect this to (continue to) be a long and bumpy ride.

All images and text © Julie Travis

 

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The place where all the starlings meet

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Photo by Julie Travis

I’ve been talking to Ginger Mayerson of Wapshott Press and a few things about the new collection are now more or less settled. The title will be We Are All Falling Towards The Centre Of The Earth and should contain either seven or eight stories. After a week away at Avebury, I’m now back working on the last two stories – Beautiful Silver Spacesuits and March Of The Marvellous. ‘March…’ will be rather different to the rest of the stories – it began as an excerpt from my first novel The Gathering, which still needs a huge amount of work on it, but the piece is being developed into a stand-alone story. The original idea is probably the best part of a decade old, but it’s always been waiting in the wings to hopefully see the light of day.

As for the proposed feature on the film Rebel Dykes for Diva magazine – the film still needs funds in order to be finished and released, which I dearly hope will happen eventually. The story behind the feature is quite a farce, however, where I suspect I’ve suffered both ageism and disablism at the hands of one person involved in the film’s production. Diva’s editor recently left the magazine and to date the Deputy Editor has not responded to my email about the feature. I may name names and tell the full story at some point, but I now have no idea whether this feature will ever be written. I send my best wishes to everyone else involved in the film.

All images and text © Julie Travis

 

Defiling ‘The Art’: writing for money

Roughtor, Cornwall

Roughtor, Cornwall

Horror writer and now columnist for Black Static magazine Lynda E Rucker recently wrote about hearing Clive Barker make a speech back in the 1990s about The Art of writing and how sacred it was, presumably arguing against writing any old rubbish in order to make money. Rucker dismissed Barker with a very realistic wave of the hand – nearly all writers have jobs of one sort of another in order to survive, and if that included writing for money rather than Art then it was just practical.

I have to agree with both of them. The odd payment for a piece of fiction is very much appreciated but doesn’t usually cover more than the cost of printer ink. I’ve had various jobs over the years, all in the public sector for political reasons, but for the last decade or so I’ve been declared unfit to work due to having had several nervous breakdowns. I still managed to keep my head above water financially, writing bits and pieces for the gay press when I was living in London and have got used to poverty, going without shiny things (apart from the odd cd and book) as a matter of course and actually not wanting or needing much, but the vicious welfare cuts by the Tory government now means I’m in an untenable financial position. Not yet Foodbank poor, but certainly picking-pennies-off-the-pavement poor.

However, Barker is right in that I have been striving to write fiction that grabs you and propels you Elsewhere, that makes you think about the darkness of Life, that celebrates the Other, the misfit, the weirdo (and sometimes this simply means having a story centred around female characters). Whether or not I achieve that is arguable, but that’s what I aim for. Anything less is a waste of trees. The articles I wrote for the gay press were all things I was passionate about: political activism, debt, mental illness, self harm, interviews with bands, performance poets and legal activists. But now things are so bad I’m remembering what my dear, departed mother kept telling me to do: write crap. That I could turn my hand to light fiction that might be meaningless to me but could make me enough money to allow a bit of financial breathing space. It was something I always refused to do – writing is an Art, and trees are not to be wasted – but my principles won’t pay the rent. So I’ve begun some light fiction for a magazine that, shall we say, appeals to Middle Englanders (if that term means anything at all). I’ve read some of the fiction in the magazine and was bored almost to tears. Light is an understatement. Still, it gave me the feel of what was needed, so I’ve sketched out a story and am working on a first draft.

The submission guidelines state: nothing upsetting or frightening, nothing supernatural. It took a couple of weeks to get into that kind of headspace (bearing in mind I’m also still working on a dark fantasy story), but I’m there and will give it my best shot, submit it and see what the reaction is. The discipline needed to write in a completely different genre is good for me and I’ve got years of writing experience – I should be able to give it a good go. I’ve changed genres before, to a limited level, writing slash fiction (about TJ Hooker!) on the Barbelith forum and my articles for The Pink Paper and Diva magazine were based on their house styles. Should I get something published in this magazine (and I know it will be far from easy to do so), I will bless the money that comes with it, but I don’t know if I will ever forgive myself. And the trees certainly won’t.